Literature Connections to
Quadice

Teacher's Guides > Quadice

Books that involve computation and several storybooks in which numbers play an important role are cited. In addition, there is a book about a game in which the roll of two dice determines the outcome. Because dice are used to play QUADICE and the game involves probability, be sure to check the books listed under the GEMS guide In All Probability.

Anno’s Math Games
Anno’s Math Games II
Anno’s Mysterious Multiplying Jar
Erin McEwan, Your Days Are Numbered
Jumanji
The King’s Chessboard
The Phantom Tollbooth
The Toothpaste Millionaire

Anno’s Math Games
by Mitsumasa Anno
Philomel Books/Putnam & Grosset, New York. 1982
Grades: 2–5
Picture puzzles, games, and simple activities introduce the mathematical concepts of multiplication, sequence, ordinal numbering, measurement, and direction.
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Anno’s Math Games II
by Mitsumasa Anno
Philomel/Putnam & Grosset, New York. 1987
Grades: 2–4
Here are more picture puzzles, games, and simple activities that introduce the mathematical concepts of multiplication, sequence, ordinal numbering, measurement, and direction.
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Anno’s Mysterious Multiplying Jar
by Masaichiro and Mitsumasa Anno
Philomel/Putnam & Grosset, New York. 1983
Grades: 3–8
The simple text and illustrations introduce the mathematical concept of factorials. Through an understanding of multiplication, you can learn about factorials and the way that numbers can expand. On a second reading of the book, students can follow along using calculators to verify the large number of jars at the end of the story.
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Erin McEwan, Your Days Are Numbered
by Alan Ritchie
Alfred A. Knopf, New York. 1990
Grades: 4–8
Erin, a sixth grader with an intense fear of numbers, takes a job at the delicatessen and needs to learn bookkeeping to stay employed. With the encouragement of the owner, Erin surprises herself by not only improving her math skills, but she catches a bookkeeping error that saves thousands of dollars! Though stereotypical in its portrayal of women as being unskilled in math, the book is an opportunity to discuss and dispel that belief.
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Jumanji
by Chris Van Allsburg
Houghton Mifflin, Boston. 1981
Grades: K–5
A bored brother and sister left on their own find a discarded board game (called Jumanji) which turns their home into an exotic jungle. A final roll of the dice for two sixes helps them escape from an erupting volcano. After reading the book, and based on their experiences with the GEMS QUADICE activities, students could investigate dice and discover more about the probability of rolling two sixes in a row.
Return to title list.

The King’s Chessboard
by David Birch; illustrated by Devis Grebu
Dial Books, New York. 1988
Grades: K–6
A proud king, too vain to admit what he does not know, learns a valuable lesson when he readily grants his wise man a special request. One grain of rice on the first square of a chessboard on the first day, two grains on the second square on the second day, four grains on the third square on the third day and so on. After several days the counting of rice grains gives way to weighing, then the weighing gives way to counting sackfuls, then to wagonfuls. The king soon realizes that there is not enough rice in the entire world to fulfill the wise man’s request.
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The Phantom Tollbooth
by Norton Juster; illustrated by Jules Feiffer
Random House, New York. 1989
Grades: 2–8
Milo has mysterious and magical adventures when he drives his car past the Phantom Tollbooth and discovers The Lands Beyond. On his journey, Milo encounters numbers, geometry, measurement and problem solving in amusing situations. The play on words in the text is delightful.
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The Toothpaste Millionaire
by Jean Merrill; illustrated by Jan Palmer
Houghton Mifflin, Boston. 1972
Grades: 5–8
Twelve-year-old Rufus Mayflower doesn’t start out to become a millionaire—just to make toothpaste. Assisted by his friend Kate and his math class (which becomes known as Toothpaste 1), his company grows from a laundry room operation to a corporation with stocks and bank loans. Many opportunities for estimations and calculations are presented including cubic inches, a gross of toothpaste tubes bought at auction, manufacturing expenses, and profits. An ideal book to illustrate the need for, and use of, mathematics in real-world problem solving.
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