Literature Connections to
Involving Dissolving

Teacher's Guides > Involving Dissolving

Two books depict crystals dissolving, one from an ant’s perspective and another as it would appear through a microscope. A picture book featuring a deer licking salt provides a nice literary extension to those activities in this unit that involve salt. Another book deals with evaporation in the context of the water cycle and water purification.

Keep on the lookout for books which help children understand more about the nature of crystals and dissolving, or the use of filtration or crystallization as a methods of purification or separation. Let the GEMS project know about them!

Greg’s Microscope
The Magic School Bus at the Waterworks
Mystery Day
Salt
Salt Hands

Two Bad Ants

Greg’s Microscope
by Millicent E. Selsam; illustrated by Arnold Lobel
Harper & Row, New York. 1963
Grades: 2–4
Greg’s father buys him a microscope and he finds an unlimited array of items around the house to observe, even the hair of Mrs. Broom’s poodle. The illustrations show the salt and sugar crystals, threads, hair, and other material as it appears to him magnified. Solutions of salt and sugar give him a chance to see crystals dissolve. Although this is not a high tech, state-of-the art representation, the fun and empowering experience of playing with scale are well portrayed.
Return to title list.


The Magic School Bus at the Waterworks
by Joanna Cole; illustrated by Bruce Degen
Scholastic, Inc., New York. 1986
Grades: K–6
When Ms. Frizzle, the strangest teacher in school, takes her class on a field trip to the waterworks, everyone ends up experiencing the water purification system from the inside. Evaporation, the water cycle, and filtration are just a few of the concepts communicated in this whimsical fantasy field trip.
Return to title list.

Mystery Day
by Harriet Ziefert; illustrated by Richard Brown
Little, Brown & Co., Boston. 1988
Grades: 1–4
Mystery Day is a school day full of surprises for Mr. Rose’s students. They have to guess the identity of five mystery powders. The students test their guesses with simple experiments as they look at the powders, touch them, taste them, and mix them with various liquids to see what happens. Once they are correctly guessed, several powders are mixed together and the investigation process starts all over again.
Return to title list.

Salt
by Harve Zemach; illustrated by Margot Zemach
Farrar, Straus & Giroux, New York. 1977
Grades: 2–4
This Russian tale tells of a rich merchant’s third son, Ivan the Fool, who discovers an island with a mountain of salt. To market his ship’s cargo of salt to a foreign king, he secretly adds salt to the food cooking in the royal kitchen. The story could introduce a discussion of how and why salt enhances the flavor of food. The rest of the story involves a beautiful princess, his evil brothers, and a helpful giant.
Return to title list.

Salt Hands
by Jane C. Aragon; illustrated by Ted Rand
E.P. Dutton, New York. 1989
Grades: Preschool–2
On a moonlit summer night, a young girl awakens to find a deer in her yard. She sprinkles salt in her hands and goes out to stand near it. The deer moves closer, and finally licks the salt from her hand until it is all gone. Lends a nice extension to the activities involving salt by providing an opportunity to discuss the need that animals (and people!) have for salt in their diets.
Return to title list.

Two Bad Ants
by Chris Van Allsburg
Houghton Mifflin, Boston. 1988
Grades: Preschool–4
When two curious ants set off in search of beautiful sparkling crystals (sugar), it becomes a dangerous adventure that convinces them to return to the former safety of their ant colony. Illustrations are drawn from an ant’s perspective, showing them lugging individual sugar crystals and other views from “the small.” Good extension to those activities that deal with sugar, dissolving, and crystals.
Return to title list.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

top

Lawrence Hall of Science    © 2018 UC Regents. All rights reserved.    Contact GEMS    Updated February 06, 2015