Literature Connections to
Hot Water and Warm Homes from Sunlight


Teacher's Guides > Hot Water and Warm Homes from Sunlight

A Chilling Story: How Things Cool Down
by Eve and Albert Stwertka; illustrated by Mena Dolobowsky
Julian Messner/Simon & Schuster, New York. 1991
Grades: 5–8
Humorous black and white drawings show a family and its cat testing out the principles of how refrigeration and air conditioning work, with sections on heat transfer, evaporation, and expansion. The explanations are simple and easy to understand.

Einstein Anderson Lights Up the Sky
by Seymour Simon; illustrated by Fred Winkowski
Viking Press, New York. 1982
Grades: 4–7
In Chapter 4, “The Snow Job,” the properties of snow as an insulator figure in the solution of the mystery.

Einstein Anderson Shocks His Friends
by Seymour Simon; illustrated by Fred Winkowski
Viking Press, New York. 1980
Grades: 4–7
In “The Case of the Snow Sculpture Contest” Einstein Anderson saves the 6th grade snow sculpture from melting before the judging by insulating it with blankets.

Einstein Anderson Tells a Comet’s Tale
by Seymour Simon; illustrated by Fred Winkowski
Viking Press, New York. 1981
Grades: 4–7
Chapter 10 describes a soapbox derby race in which both teams have to build soapbox racing cars that weigh the same amount and are started in the same way. Our hero identifies the one test variable that allows his team to win the race.

June 29, 1999
by David Wiesner
Clarion Books, Houghton Mifflin, New York. 1992
Grades: 3–6
The science project of Holly Evans takes an extraordinary turn—or does it? This highly imaginative and humorous book has a central
experimental component, and conveys the sense of unexpected results.

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

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