Literature Connections to
Eggs Eggs Everywhere

Teacher's Guides > Eggs Eggs Everywhere

Box Turtle at Long Pond
The Button Box
Chickens Aren’t the Only Ones
The Chicken’s Child
Circles, Triangles and Squares
Egg Pop-Ups
An Extraordinary Egg
Flap Your Wings
The Golden Egg Book

Horton Hatches the Egg
Is It Larger? Is It Smaller?
Mrs. Sato’s Hens
Rechenka’s Eggs
Seven Eggs
Swimmy
Tap! Tap! ... the egg cracked
Tracks in the Sand
Whose Shoes Are These?
The Wolf’s Chicken Stew

Box Turtle at Long Pond
by William T. George; illustrated by Lindsay Barrett George
Greenwillow Books, New York. 1989
Grades: Preschool–2
This nicely illustrated book describes the events of the day for a box turtle.
Connection: Activity 3

The Button Box
by Margarette S. Reid; illustrated by Sarah Chamberlain
Dutton Children’s Books, New York. 1990
Grades: Preschool–2

A young boy explores his grandmother’s button box and categorizes buttons by various attributes. After reading the story, students will be inspired to sort buttons many ways! Also available in Spanish as La Caja De Los Botones.
Connection: Activity 2

Chickens Aren’t the Only Ones
by Ruth Heller
Grosset and Dunlap, New York. 1981
Grades: Preschool–2

The brightly colored, almost three-dimensional, illustrations depict the diversity of all egg-laying animals as well as egg laying behaviors, and the sizes and shapes of eggs. Also available in Spanish as Las gallinas no son las unicas (Grosset & Dunlap, New York. 1992).
Connection: Activity 2, Session 1

The Chicken’s Child
by Margaret A. Hartelius
Scholastic, New York. 1975
Grades: Preschool–2

This wordless book is a humorous account of a hen hatching a crocodile egg. As the crocodile grows, it gets itself into all kinds of trouble. The crocodile almost loses its home until it saves its "mother’s" life. This is a great book to develop language, and is clearly unrealistic enough not to confuse even the youngest reader about what really hatches from a chicken egg.
Connection: Activity 2

Circles, Triangles and Squares
by Tana Hoban
Macmillan, New York. 1974
Grades: Preschool–2

This books examines shapes. By the same author, Round and Round and Round (Macmillan, New York. 1983) also examines shapes, especially those that are round.
Connection: Activity 4

Crocodile Egg Pop-Ups
Duck Egg Pop-Ups
Lizard Egg Pop-Ups
Owl Egg Pop-Ups
Penguin Egg Pop-Ups
Turtle Egg Pop-Ups
Illustrated by Bob Bampton
Golden Books/Western Publishing, New York. 1994
Grades: Preschool–2

In each of this lovely series of six little pop-up books information is given about the animal, the shape of its egg, where it lays its eggs, and the parent’s role in hatching the egg. The grand finale in each volume is the wonderful pop-up of the baby animal emerging from the egg.
Connection: Activity 1, Activity 3 (Turtle Egg Pop-Ups)

An Extraordinary Egg
by Leo Lionni
Alfred A. Knopf, New York. 1994
Grades: K–2

Jessica the frog finds a beautiful, round, white egg that she mistakes for a stone. One of her frog friends recognizes it as a chicken’s egg. When it hatches a few days later, they call the animal that emerges a chicken. The children will immediately delight in this mistake as they recognize the newborn animal as an alligator! Eventually the alligator is returned to its rightful mom with plenty of laughs along the way.
Connection: Activity 2

Flap Your Wings
by P.D. Eastman
Random House, New York. 1969
Grades: K–2

When Mr. and Mrs. Bird discover a strange egg in their nest, placed there by a boy, they decide to try to hatch it and are surprised when the hatchling turns out to be an alligator.
Connection: Activity 1

The Golden Egg Book
by Margaret Wise Brown; illustrated by Leonard Weisgard
Western Publishing, Racine, Wisconsin. 1975
Grades: Preschool–1

A little bunny who finds an egg isn’t sure what will come out of it and is impatient to find out. When a duck finally hatches from the egg, the bunny is surprised and pleased to have a new friend.
Connection: Activity 1

Horton Hatches the Egg
by Dr. Seuss (Theodore Geisel)
Random House, New York. 1940
Grades: Preschool–2
When a lazy bird hatching an egg wants a vacation, she asks Horton, an elephant, to sit on her egg—which he does throug all sorts of hazards. In the end, he is rewarded for doing what he said he would.
Connection: Activity 2

Is It Larger? Is It Smaller?
by Tana Hoban
Greenwillow Books, New York. 1985
Grades: Preschool–2

Readers are invited to find the smaller or smallest of two or more similar objects in each photograph. This helps children begin to focus on the attribute of large and small, which is one way of sorting a set of objects.
Connection: Activity 2

Mrs. Sato’s Hens
by Laura Min; illustrated by Benrei Huang
GoodYearBooks/Scott, Foresman and Co., Glenview, Illinois. 1994
Grades: Preschool–2

A little girl’s visits to Mrs. Sato’s hens over a week. As the days go by, she and Mrs. Sato count the variety of eggs laid by different hens until a surprise ending on Saturday when they discover something new in the hen house! A variety of hens as well as hen eggs are illustrated.
Connection: Activity 1

Rechenka’s Eggs
by Patricia Polacco
Philomel Books, New York. 1988
Grades: K–2
Babushka paints beautiful eggs through the cold of winter to take to the Easter Festival. One day, Babushka rescues an injured goose, which later has a terrible accident and breaks all of Babushka’s eggs! However, the goose lays thirteen marvelously colored eggs to replace the broken ones—and leaves behind one final miracle in egg form before returning to her own kind.
Connection: Activity 1

Seven Eggs
by Meredith Hooper; illustrated by Terry McKenna
Harper & Row, New York. 1985
Grades: K–2
Each day of the week an egg cracks open and out emerges a different animal. On the seventh day a surprise is hatched for all! The eggs that hatch are different shapes and sizes and presented in an inviting format.
Connection: Activity 1, Session 2

Swimmy
by Leo Lionni
Alfred A. Knopf, New York. 1963
Grades: Preschool–2
A clever little black fish discovers a way for his school of little red fish to swim together and be protected from larger predators. With Swimmy as the "eye," the fish swim in formation masquerading as a big fish. Included are examples of other animals that live in the water.
Connection: Activity 3

Tap! Tap! ... the egg cracked
by Keith Faulkner; illustrated by Jonathan Lambert
Marlboro Books, New York. 1992
Grades: Preschool–2
A hen losses her egg and in her search for it, she encounters many kinds of eggs and the animals who laid them. The shape of each animal’s egg is accurately shown in "lift the flap" fashion, which allows the reader to peak in and see the baby animal hatching out of its egg. Of course, mother hen finds her egg and out of it comes a sweet little chick!
Connection: Activity 1 and 2

Tracks in the Sand
by Loreen Leedy
Doubleday, New York. 1993
Grades: Preschool–3
With full-page illustrations and clear text, this book describes the life cycle of loggerhead turtles, beginning with the female leaving the sea to bury her eggs in the sand. An afterword provides more in-depth biological information.
Connection: Activity 3

Whose Shoes Are These?
by Ron Roy; photographs by Rosemarie Hausherr
Clarion Books/Ticknor and Fields, New York. 1988
Grades: Preschool–4
Nineteen types of shoes and footwear are depicted in photographs of children and adults from around the world. Have children examine their shoes and sort and classify. By the same author and publisher, Whose Hat is That? (1987) explores a variety of hats and the people who wear them.
Connection: Activity 2

The Wolf’s Chicken Stew
by Keiko Kasza
G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York. 1987
Grades: K–2
A hungry wolf attempts to fatten a chicken for his stew pot by bringing delectable items to the chicken’s doorstep in quantities or weights of 100. When he finally arrives to capture her for his stew, he has quite a surprise as the mother hen’s many little chicks come out to greet him. This story makes a nice springboard into investigations of 100 items.
Connection: Activity 1

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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